Book: Into The Bright Unknown by Rae Carson

Book: Into The Bright Unknown by Rae Carson

Published October 2017 by Greenwillow Books|343 pages

Where I Got It: I borrowed the hardcover from the library

Series: The Gold Seer Trilogy #3

Genre: YA Historical Fiction

The stunning conclusion to Rae Carson’s New York Times–bestselling Gold Seer trilogy, which Publishers Weekly in a starred review called “Simply terrific.” A historical fantasy brimming with magic, romance, and adventure—perfect for fans of Leigh Bardugo, Sarah Maas, and Westworld.

Leah Westfall, her fiancé Jefferson, and her friends have become rich in the California Territory, thanks to Lee’s magical ability to sense precious gold. But their fortune has made them a target, and when a dangerous billionaire sets out to destroy them, Lee and her friends decide they’ve had enough—they will fight back with all their power and talents. Lee’s magic is continuing to strengthen and grow, but someone is on to her—someone who might have a bit of magic herself. The stakes are higher than ever as Lee and her friends hatch a daring scheme that could alter the California landscape forever. With a distinctive young heroine and a unique interpretation of American history, Into the Bright Unknown strikes a rich vein of romance, magic, and adventure, bringing the Gold Seer Trilogy to its epic conclusion.

I’ve really liked this series, and I thought this last book was a pretty good ending to a pretty interesting series.

What I liked the most was seeing how much Lee’s ability changed, and how she became more okay with using it.  I also liked seeing her discover how to develop her ability, and how there are other people with abilities out there.  I really wish we saw more of that, because I was surprised that other people had their own special abilities.  I know the series is focused on Lee and what she can do but I still wish we saw more of what other people could do.

It’s weird, though, I don’t really see it as a historical fantasy series.  I mean, even though there’s Lee, who can sense gold, it still wasn’t enough to make it a fantasy.  At least for me.  It was a lot more historical that fantasy, and there was enough going on that wasn’t related to Lee’s ability that I don’t really see it as a fantasy.

We don’t see any more of Lee’s uncle, and I am curious about what trouble he’s up to.  Instead, we see a lot more of the guy that her uncle was working for/owed money to.  I wondered if we’d see him again, and what role he would play in this book.  He is not a good guy, let’s just say that.

Lee and her friends really do go through a lot.  I’m glad things worked out for Mrs. Joyner and getting her things, but of course, there are some bumps along the way.  It really was sad she couldn’t sign for her things, and that she had to rely on her father-in-law to come sign it for everything.  I really felt for her and Lee (plus all of the other woman like them), who did everything they could to survive, but still couldn’t get everything they wanted because they were women.  Hopefully things got better for them, and that things calmed down for all of them after the end of the book.

I’m still not a fan of the romance between Lee and Jefferson.  Even though it’s been a minimal part of the series, and very much relegated to the background, I could have done without it completely.  It felt like they had no chemistry whatsoever, and it really did feel like they were together because they didn’t have anyone else.  To be honest, I thought she had more chemistry with the college students than she did with Jefferson.  Lee seemed happy with Jefferson, though, and that’s important, even though I wasn’t thrilled with their relationship.

4 stars.  I didn’t love it, and it was a little predictable at times, but I still really enjoyed it.

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Book Review: Like A River Glorious by Rae Carson

Book: Like A River Glorious by Rae Carson

Published September 2016 by Greenwillow Books|432 pages

Where I Got It: I borrowed the e-book from the library

Series: The Gold Seer Trilogy #2

Genre: YA Historical Fiction/Fantasy

After a harrowing journey across the country, Leah Westfall and her friends have finally arrived in California and are ready to make their fortunes in the Gold Rush. Lee has a special advantage over the other new arrivals in California—she has the ability to sense gold, a secret known only by her handsome best friend Jefferson and her murdering uncle Hiram.

Lee and her friends have the chance to be the most prosperous settlers in California, but Hiram hasn’t given up trying to control Lee and her power. Sabotage and kidnapping are the least of what he’ll do to make sure Lee is his own. His mine is the deepest and darkest in the territory, and there Lee learns the full extent of her magical gift, the worst of her uncle, and the true strength of her friendships. To save everyone, she vows to destroy her uncle and the empire he is building—even at the cost of her own freedom.

The second epic historical fantasy in the Gold Seer trilogy by Rae Carson, the acclaimed author of The Girl of Fire and Thorns.

I really liked this book!  I really liked the first one as well when I read it, and I don’t know why it took me so long to continue reading the series.  At the least the last one is out, and I can start reading it soon.

I loved seeing Lee and her friends build up a community.  It really is built on friendship, and I really liked that, because I feel like it doesn’t come up in historical fiction a lot.  I also liked that she let them in on her secret, because it means she really trusted them.

I really hate her uncle Hiram.  He’s a horrible person, and what he did was not okay.  I am curious about whether a particular revelation is true- I hope it’s not, and that he was just lying in the hopes that it would get Lee to help him. I was glad to see her handle it the way she did.  However, this book is more of trying to escape Hiram.  In the first book, I knew we hadn’t seen the last of him, but with how this book ended, I am curious to see if we’ll see him again, or if there will be a different villain.  Things were pretty tied up in this book, I thought, so maybe there will be another adventure for our characters.

The slavery of Chinese and Native Americans was really hard to read.  I can’t speak to the representation of either group, but I wonder if maybe the book did play into the white saviour trope.  I really wish I had paid more attention to that when I was reading the book, but I may have to re-read it again.

I also am not a big fan of the romance between Lee and Jefferson.  It seems really forced, and she, to me, doesn’t seem very interested in him romantically, but he still keeps asking her to marry him.  Like she’ll eventually change her mind if he asks her enough.  I know that was a time when being married would probably give her a lot more protection that being unmarried would, but I don’t blame her one bit for not wanting to be married.  I can’t see her married, and I think she and Jefferson really are better off as friends.

It did seem a little slow at times, especially at the beginning.  It did pick up, but even then, it seemed like it was dragging a little.  Still, I do want to read the next book to see what happens.

4 stars.  I did really like it, even though I’m not sure about how some of the characters are represented.  And even though it seems like things are pretty resolved, I do want to know what’s going to happen next.